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Olingo fluffy-tailed, or Olingo Gabby

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Bassaricyon gabbii - Olingo commun ... Wikipédia en Français

Bassaricyon gabbii - Olingo commun ... Wikipédia en Français

Bassaricyon gabbii - pūkuotauodegis olingas statusas T sritis zoologija | vardynas taksono rangas rūšis atitikmenys: lot. Bassaricyon gabbii angl. bushy tailed olingo vok. Schlankbär rus. furry-tailed olingo ryšiai: platesnis terminas - olingai ... Žinduolių pavadinimų žodynas

Bassaricyon - Pour les articles homonymes, voir Lingo ... Wikipédia en Français

Bassaricyon - Bassaricyon ... Wikipedia Español

Bassaricyon - Makibären Systematik Unterklasse: Höhere Säugetiere (Eutheria) Überordnung: Laurasiatheria Ordnung: Raubtiere (Carnivora) ... Deutsch Wikipedia

Bassaricyon - Pour les articles homonymes, voir Lingo. Bassaricyon ... Wikipédia en Français

Olingo commun - Bassaricyon gabbii Olingo commun ... Wikipédia en Français

Olingo de gabbi - Bassaricyon gabbii Olingo commun ... Wikipédia en Français

Olingo de gabbi - Bassaricyon gabbii Olingo commun ... Wikipédia en Français

Kinkajou a face pale - Bassaricyon Pour les articles homonymes, voir Lingo ... Wikipédia en Français

Spread

It occurs from Nicaragua to Bolivia, in some places of the range it is common and abundant, in others it is rare (for example, in the western part of the Amazon basin).

Marked in Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Bolivia, Panama.

Habitat Olingo - evergreen tropical forests (up to a height of 2000 m above sea level). It occurs both in the forest itself and at the edges. Olingo prefers the upper canopy of the forest and is rarely found on earth.

Appearance

The Olingo Gabby has an elongated pointed muzzle and rounded small ears. Males and females have approximately the same body size. The body is covered with thick soft hair. The nose and hind limbs are short. The underside of the legs is partially covered with fur, the nails are very sharp. Females have one pair of inguinal mammary glands.

The color of fur olingo from taupe to yellowish or golden on top and fawn below. On the tail, you can see light rings located along its middle part.

The length of the body of the Gabby Olingo is 350-470 mm, the tail - from 400 to 480 mm. The total length of the body with the tail is 750–955 mm (an average of 850 mm). Body weight - 970-1500 g.

Both sides of the anus have odorous glands, which are used by the olingo to mark the territory. The function of odor labels, perhaps, is to attract members of the opposite sex or mark the boundaries of their territory. Tactile communication is important in a competitive relationship, between male and female, as well as between mothers and their young offspring.

Species: Bassaricyon gabbii J. Allen, 1876 = Olingo Gabby or fluffy tail

Olingo Gabby is commonly found in the Americas from Nicaragua to Bolivia and is found in Panama, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Colombia and Bolivia. His body is covered with thick, soft hair, which can have a color from gray-brown to yellowish or golden on top and fawn on the bottom. The tail is long, from 400 to 480 mm, but not grasping. On it, light rings located along the middle part are clearly distinguishable.

Olingo Gabby has an elongated pointed muzzle and slightly rounded small ears. The hind limbs are short, shorter than the front. The underside of the legs is partially covered with fur, the nails are very sharp. Both males and females have approximately the same body size - their length ranges from 350 to 470 mm, and their weight is 970-1500 g.

Gabby Olingo live in evergreen rainforests from sea level to a height of 2,000 meters. These animals are equally well adapted to living both in the depths of forests in their most often, and along their edge - at the edges.

Here, the Gabby olingos find the most diverse food, although the basis of their diet is the fruits of fruit trees, nectar and juice, flowers, as well as insects and all kinds of small vertebrates. It can be small mammalsfeeding, in particular, rodents, birds (mainly their eggs and chicks), as well as amphibians and reptiles.

Since the Gabby Olingos are nocturnal, they do not directly compete with most primates. At the same time, Gabby olingos are probably food competitors of many diurnal primates, eating the fruits of the same plant species. Sometimes they can eat fruits in orchards, but due to their low abundance, they do not constitute a serious threat to the crop.

It is interesting that when keeping olingos in captivity, they give more preference to meat and meat products than fruits.

Olingo Gabby are predominantly woody and nocturnal. They prefer the upper canopy of the forest and are rarely found on earth. The Olingos are extremely agile, climbing trees and making big jumps, easily overcoming the air up to three meters.

There is practically no information about the life expectancy of Gabby Olingo and it was only noted that in captivity one individual lived for almost 25 years. In nature, according to experts, the life expectancy of olingo is no more than 10 years. Here, oligos can be attacked by jaguars if they find themselves in the lower tier of trees and tree snakes.

All day olingos spend in the nest, usually located in the trunk of a hollow tree, and made of dry plant materials.

They have odorous glands located on both sides of the anus, which are used in particular for marking the territory. The function of this smell, perhaps, is to attract members of the opposite sex, or to mark the boundaries of the territory. Since they are mammals, it is likely that optical visual signals, such as body postures, are used in some situations when various individuals come in contact. Tactile communication is undoubtedly important in a competitive relationship, between male and female, as well as between mothers and their young offspring.

Olingo Gabby is usually found singly, but quite large groups are sometimes noted, up to six individuals feeding together with mature fruits on large fruit trees. At the same time, Gabby olingos contact individuals of their species using a characteristic challenge.

In the mating season (which can begin at any time of the year), olingos do not create pairs for a long time, and therefore they mate with different individuals many times during their life (this is the so-called illegible mating system).

After a 73-74 day gestation period, the females give birth to one cub each. Young people are born naked, without hair, and like most carnivores, with their eyes closed. Birth weight is about 55 g. At the age of about 27 days old, the eyes of young people open. The female has one pair of inguinal mammary glands, which completely provide the baby with milk.

Thick solid food, usually begins to be consumed by cubs when they are 2 months old, at the same time they are finally weaned.

It is not known exactly how long young animals stay with their mothers, but, like most carnivores, they must learn how food is found and mined. Therefore, young olingos in the period after the end of breastfeeding probably create some association with their mothers - for the period of maturation and the formation of the cubs. It is not known for a long time that young animals stay with their mothers for a long time, but, in most carnivores, they must learn how to find food. Therefore, the young period after the end of breastfeeding probably creates some association with their mothers - to mature the formation of the cubs.

All care for babies rests entirely with the female: she provides them with milk, care and protection. Males do not take part in caring for offspring.

At present, the Gabby olingo in some parts of the range is common and even plentiful, in others it is rare, for example, in the western part of the Aamazonka basin. Deforestation leads to the destruction of habitats suitable for Olingo and to fragmentation of the range. Gabing olingo is now listed in Appendix III of Sites CONVENTION Sites in Costa Rica, and on the IUCN Red List as a low-risk (threat) species.

Diet and Feeding Behavior

Olingo Gabby eats a wide variety of foods. The basis of the diet is the fruit of fruit trees, nectar and juice, flowers, insects, as well as all kinds of small vertebrates. He actively hunts warm-blooded animals: birds (eats their eggs and chicks), mammals, as well as amphibians and reptiles.

When kept in captivity in the diet of the olingo, meat and meat products occupy a large part, and the smaller part occupies.

Activity

Olingo Gabby leads a predominantly arboreal nocturnal lifestyle. Olingos spend all day in a nest made of dry plants and located in a hollow tree trunk. Agile, climbs trees, makes big jumps, easily overcoming the air up to three meters.

Usually olingo occurs singly, but sometimes quite large groups (up to six individuals) are observed, feeding together with mature fruits on large fruit trees.

Since Gabby Olingos are nocturnal, they practically do not compete directly with most primates.

Breeding

The marriage system is illegible, i.e. they do not create steam for a long time and mate with various individuals. These animals can obviously give birth once a year without a specific breeding season. There is no definite confinement of the mating season to any season.

Puberty occurs at about 21-24 months. Olingo's pregnancy lasts 73–74 days. Gabby Olingo females give birth to one cub each. Young cubs are born naked, without hair, with their eyes closed. The weight of newborns is about 55 grams. Eyes open on day 27. The duration of lactation is up to two months.

All care for the offspring lies entirely with the female - she provides them with milk, care and protection.

It is not known how long young olingos stay with their mothers.

Interesting Facts

Olingo contacts individuals of his own species using a characteristic cry challenge.

Eningo's enemies are a jaguar, tree snakes, but the greatest danger is humans.

Olingo Gabby plays an insignificant role in dispersing the seeds they eat and in regulating the numbers of some small vertebrates that they feed on.

Olingos are probably food competitors of many diurnal primates, feeding on the fruits of some species. Sometimes they can eat fruits in the gardens, but because of their low abundance, they do not constitute a serious threat to the crop.

Olingo Gabby is listed in Appendix III of the CITES Convention in Costa Rica, as well as in the International Red Book, as a low-risk species.

Deforestation leads to the destruction of habitats suitable for Olingo and to fragmentation of their range.

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